Alumni News -Peaches and Brownie (formerly Julia and Popea)

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Thanks again to all of you for helping us adopt Peaches and Brownie (formerly Julia and Popea). Peaches is the mom and Brownie is the daughter.

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They love to rough house and then take naps together in the sunlight.

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They also love feathered toys and looking out the window at people walking their dogs.

Thank you very much , Christina

 

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Posted in Alumni

The Tippy Tuxies

Tipsy Tuxies

Tipsy Tuxies

I met Calvin, Daisy and Rosie (The Tippy Tuxies) at their adoption photo shoot. My cat of 19 years, Kitty Wampus, who was also a tuxedo cat, had passed away a few days before. Photo days are like a kitten party so I was really looking forward to a little “kitten therapy”. Basically I play with kittens while taking their pictures. On July 16, 2016, The Tippy Tuxies came in for photos. They were being fostered by Linda, another Feline Rescue volunteer. I saw a glimpse of them in their carriers so I knew there were tuxedo kittens but I still wasn’t prepared for their resemblance to Kitty Wampus. Rosie and Daisy had nearly the exact same markings.

Calvin on the day he came in for pictures

Calvin on the day he came in for pictures

The Tippy Tuxies have that name because they were born with cerebellar hypoplasia (CH). I’ve photographed a few kittens with CH before so I knew CH kitties can be rather difficult to photograph. Their heads wobble and they tend to have erratic movements, so sometimes it can be harder to get clear photos of them. Rosie and Calvin mainly seemed to have some fancy footwork but were otherwise normal kittens. Calvin walks with a high-step that looks like a trot or a prance. It was so adorable! They fell over a little bit, but they were mostly just sweet, charming and adorable kittens. Daisy, however, couldn’t walk or stand without leaning on something.

Rosie

Rosie

A little bit about Cerebellar Hypoplasia
Feline cerebellar hypoplasia (CH) is a non-progressive, non-contagious neurological condition that results in walking and balance problems. A kitten is born with CH when her cerebellum, the part of the brain that controls fine motor skills and coordination, is underdeveloped at birth. Consequently, an underdeveloped cerebellum can result in underdeveloped or complicated mobility. CH cats are known for their “drunken sailor” walk, which is why they’re known endearingly as “wobbly cats.” Since the condition is non-progressive, it will never get worse — and in some cases, owners say that their cat became more capable over time [as they learn to adapt to their disability and develop muscles]. Source: lifewithchcats.com

Daisy on the day we met

Daisy on the day we met

Shortly after this photo was taken, Daisy crawled into my lap. It took so much work for her to get there since she wasn’t able to walk at the time. The sweetness of that moment and her resemblance to Kitty Wampus brought me to tears. I then had to explain to Linda why I started crying. We talked a little bit about my recent loss, and these new kittens and we agreed that I would foster the three of them when Linda was planning to be out of town at the beginning of August. On my way home that same day, I stopped and bought them a scratching post and a few new toys for when they came to my house.

When I started fostering this trio, my goal was to get all of them adopted together. Rosie and Calvin were extremely bonded, and although Daisy was more independent, I thought it would be better for her to stay with her siblings. Although, I’m pretty sure most of the foster volunteers were already placing bets about my impending “foster fail,” I think the moment I knew was on August 9, when Paul and TJ from the Engineer’s Guide to Cats were at Feline Rescue on the day of the Cat Video Festival. I brought the trio in for the open house, and I was being asked when they’d be available for adoption. I didn’t like the idea that they might be leaving me someday!

Paul and TJ with Calvin, Daisy and Rosie

Paul and TJ with Calvin, Daisy and Rosie

After Kitty passed away, I didn’t think I would be ready to adopt for several months. However, I was open to the idea of foster failing and welcoming new cats into my home. But I had only planned to adopt a pair. The Tippy Tuxies helped me heal so much, and the three of them were so perfect together, I didn’t debate too long about adopting the three of them. Rosie and Daisy were a little bit underweight, so we waited until September to do their spay and neuter surgeries. I adopted them shortly after that.

National Specially-abled Pets Day is May 3 so I wanted to share some information on what it’s like to live with animals who would be labeled as “special needs.”

Rosie

Rosie

Cats with CH do require some special considerations, but to what extent can vary from cat to cat. Even cats in the same litter can be affected differently. The Tippy Tuxies had siblings that were not affected at all. Calvin and Rosie walk and run pretty well, but Calvin can’t jump at all, and Rosie can only jump a little bit. She’s good at jumping up to the couch, for example, but the bed is a little too high so she climbs. It helps that I have carpet thoughout most of my home. This gives them traction and helps reduce their spills and also provide a little extra padding for when they do fall. For Daisy, that carpet is essential because she needs it for traction. She is not strong enough or balanced enough to walk very well on slippery surfaces.

Calvin

Calvin

They have stairs to get up to the bed and a tray under their water bowl to catch spills. Their litter boxes have high sides and a low entry to make it easy to get in, but also for them to lean against if they need to. I found a cat tower that has levels that are closer together and easier for them to climb to the top, and also isn’t too high, so that if they fall off (or jump from the top like Rosie does), they won’t get hurt. And I try a little harder to find activities to keep them engaged. Especially for Daisy who can’t burn energy by running chasing her siblings around, it’s critical to find activities that help her develop muscle and keep her mentally stimulated.

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Daisy

Daisy’s walking has improved quite a bit since they first came to me. She was only able to walk while leaning against walls or furniture. Now she can take several steps at a time in the middle of the room without support. Another Feline Rescue volunteer, Caia, helped build a special walker for Daisy out of PVC pipe and wheels that we found instructions to make kitties on YouTube. Daisy used it a couple times for physical therapy, but later made it known that she had no intentions of being strapped into a glorified wheel chair. So I started just making her physical therapy a game by getting her to chase toys and the laser light to work on getting her strong enough to stand and walk on her own.

Walking still pretty hard for her, it takes all of her concentration to balance, take a step, and even just stand without support. It’s possible and even likely her walking skills will continue to improve over the next few months. I have hopes that she’ll be able to move around without tumbling over every few steps.

Daisy uses a wide stance to balance while standing and walking

Daisy uses a wide stance to balance while standing and walking

All three of  The Tippy Tuxies live like otherwise normal cats. They get to the litter box just fine, can eat and drink without assistance and can play and wrestle with the best of them. They are three extremely loving and sweet cats who’s fun personalities more than make up for any perceived burden of having a special needs pet (let alone three). Plus, they’re really great about posing for photos!

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If you’d like to keep tabs on the Tippy Tuxies, you can follow them on Facebook or on Instagram @TippyTuxies. They have new photographs and videos posted every day.

In honor of National Specially-abled Pets Day, May 3, please spread the word about how truly wonderful pets with “special” features can be!

Story and photos by Kris Kaiser

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Chuck & Don’s Paw Print Fundraiser

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$53,402.22!

PawPrint2016

The check presentation from Chuck & Don’s 2016 Paw Print Fundraiser took place on March 15, 2017 at Chuck & Don’s corporate office. Feline Rescue, Ruff Start Rescue and Heading Home K-9 Rescue each received a check for $53,402.22!

Feline Rescue will use this money during 2017 to surpass 1045, the number of spay and neuter surgeries done in 2016 .

Many thanks to Chuck & Don’s customers, staff and leadership for their continued support of animal rescue in Minnesota.

Posted in News

Feline Rescue Plant Sale

Plant Sale 2017

2017 Plant Sale Fundraiser
Second Date Added!
Saturday, May 27
10:00 a.m. – Noon
Saturday, May 20
9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Feline Rescue Adoption Center

Calling all gardeners and house plant growers! We need your contributions for the Feline Rescue Plant Sale on May 20.

We will accept:
• Perennials
• Annuals
• House plants
• Plant containers
• Garden ornaments
• Garden tools

Please have donations clean, potted, and ready to sell. Plants should be in tip-top condition for the sale. It would be helpful if you could label your plants with name, color flower, if applicable, and light preference.

Donations accepted: May 17, 18, 19 Drop-off at the Feline Rescue Adoption Center
10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

For more information about donating contact plantsale@events.felinerescue.org

100% of the proceeds from this event will go directly to Feline Rescue, Inc. for food, shelter and medical care for stray, abused and abandoned cats and kittens.

Help us spread the word about the Plant Sale by downloading, printing and distributing our event flyer.

PlantSale

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May Cat Claw Clipping Clinics

Cat Claw Clipping

FREE Nail Clippings at the following Chuck and Don’s locations, plus…

  • Learn why cats scratch
  • Tips on nail clipping
  • Information on the best scratching posts/surfaces

For their safety, all cats MUST be transported in carriers.

Chuck & Don’s Pet Food Outlets:

Highland Park Saint Paul
2114 Ford Parkway
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
May 27

Calhoun Village Minneapolis
3246 West Lake Street
10:30 AM – 12:30 PM
May 20

Roseville
1661 County Road C West
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
May 13

Savage
14109 Minnesota 13
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
May 13

Shakopee
1270 Vierling Drive East
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
May 13

Woodbury (New location)
265 Radio Drive, Suite G
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
May 14

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Alumni News – Marley

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My son and I recently adopted Marley and I wanted to let you know how well he is doing.

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He is quite the gentleman to the other cat, Crabbit, who lives here.

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He and my son are great friends.

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He’s been to the vet and he’s all up to date on everything now. Thank you very much for your work.

Megan

 

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National Volunteer Week April 23rd – April 29th

Gearing up for National Volunteer Week!

Feline Rescue: 20 Years of Dedi-CAT-ed Volunteers!

Feline Rescue began when the Animal Relief Fund (ARF) decided to close its shelter in 1997. About a dozen ARF volunteers formed a new organization that would have a shelter facility; and so, Feline Rescue, Inc. was born. Bylaws were developed, with the incorporators listed as Ray Birkland, Jim and Rosemary Brock, Rick Johnston, Pat McCarty, Nancy Mosier, Richard Stegall and Hertha Schulze. There were also several others in the original founding group, including Terri St. Sauver, who had experience with nonprofit organizations and helped significantly with the development of the bylaws.

Feline Rescue was first located on Charles Avenue in St. Paul. Already the fledging organization had some devoted donors, and funds willed to Feline Rescue helped to purchase the current building at 593 Fairview Avenue North in St. Paul.

Over the years, Feline Rescue grew, expanding and enhancing its Shelter, Foster and Outreach programs. The small number of volunteers 20 years ago now has increased to more than 400. You can find them greeting visitors, cleaning litterboxes, feeding and entertaining cats, socializing cats, administering medications, providing foster care, bottle feeding kittens, rescuing cats in danger, helping with spay/neuter clinics, planning and staffing events, speaking to the community, raising funds, producing newsletters, photographing cats, developing and maintaining Facebook and Web presence, maintaining databases, helping with other administrative tasks, and so much more.

Several years ago, in an article she wrote for The Scoop, Donna Bolte, shelter shift lead, said, “Who are these volunteers? What is it that initially draws them to consider mopping floors or poking pills down reluctant throats? What brings them back week after week? A profile of one shift….is indicative of just how diverse these people are……, but the common theme is interacting with our cats in a no-kill environment.”

For most of its 20 years of existence, Feline Rescue was 100 percent volunteer staffed. But when the organization purchased another building that needed repairs and remodeling, volunteer Mark Fausner was hired as the part-time facilities manager, although he continues to volunteer in other capacities. In 2016, Dana Andresen was hired as executive director to manage the ever-increasing complex multiple functions of this growing organization. And yet, volunteers still are – and always will be – the lifeblood of this organization.

Here’s what some of our volunteers have had to say about their experience with Feline Rescue:

Jocelyn LaBerge
“We have learned so much over the years that we then adopt to better the health and well-being of our cats.” — Jocelyn LaBerge, longtime volunteer, shift lead, past member of the Board of Directors, member of the Advisory Committee

Mandy and friend
“There are so many people with such boundless hearts who work so hard to save cats. I’m just proud to play a tiny part in it.” — Mandy Dwyer, foster caregiver, photographer, Instagram account manager

Kate Sheetz
“I love talking with other volunteers because we share the same interest – cats.” — Kate Sheetz, longtime volunteer, transporter of cats to the vet

“What I love most about Feline Rescue is that the cats will always have a home even if their adoptions don’t work out.” – Erin Lerwick, foster caregiver

Mary Thrall
“My interest is in adopting FeLV cats. I am pleasantly surprised with the amount of support I have received from other Feline Rescue volunteers.” – Mary Thrall, shelter greeter and caretaker, foster intake database specialist

“There’s a big difference between ‘buying’ a cat and ‘adopting’ one. We seek to find the right fit for each kitten and adult cat.” – Joan Barrett, Foster Program adoption coordinator; member, Board of Directors

“It’s hard to believe it’s already been 20 years. At the Charles Ave location, there were often only two volunteers on a shift. Now look at all the wonderful volunteers and the amazing number of cats saved, spayed/neutered and adopted.” – Richard Stegall, founder, longtime volunteer, shift lead

For the last 20 years, Feline Rescue volunteers have worked tirelessly to save abused, abandoned and stray cats, providing care and shelter and finding them new homes. With the solid foundation created by its founders and sustained by its dedicated roster of volunteers, Feline Rescue is well positioned to carry out its mission for the next 20 years and beyond.

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April Cat Claw Clipping Clinics

Cat Claw Clipping

FREE Nail Clippings at the following Chuck and Don’s locations, plus…

  • Learn why cats scratch
  • Tips on nail clipping
  • Information on the best scratching posts/surfaces

For their safety, all cats MUST be transported in carriers.

Chuck & Don’s Pet Food Outlets:

Highland Park Saint Paul
2114 Ford Parkway
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
April 22

Calhoun Village Minneapolis
3246 West Lake Street
10:30 AM – 12:30 PM
April 15

Roseville
1661 County Road C West
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
April 8

Savage
14109 Minnesota 13
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
April 8

Shakopee
1270 Vierling Drive East
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
April 8

Woodbury (New location)
265 Radio Drive, Suite G
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
April 9

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Alumni News – Geena

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We adopted Geena in February 2017 and she became ruler of the roost almost immediately. She runs around with abandon and loves to try to get us to follow her (or vice versa) around the house. Her favorite chair is the one in this picture. Seems to suit her coloring.

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We aren’t quite  sure if our 10-year old cocker spaniel Bruno always remembers we have her, but she has gotten use to his curmudgeonly ways and isn’t scared to get up next to him. And honestly, we think he doesn’t mind her either.

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Our biggest challenge… she loves her crunchies (hard food) and when she doesn’t have hers she’ll go after Bruno’s so we are trying to curtail that habit.

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She is a crazy, spunky and happy kitty and we’re so glad to have her.

Jennifer, Jon, Sylvia, and Bruno

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Alumni News – Coal (Fred) and Arabian (George)

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I adopted Coal (Fred) and Arabian (George) in November. They immediately grew faster than I would have believed!

They are easy-going, good-natured sweeties. Fred loves to be held and petted, while George loves to play a lot and check in for affection at will.

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They love their cat tree from Purrniture, as well as their other toys. George has discovered that all playing is enhanced by being inside the IKEA mesh laundry basket – including chasing Fred. Yes, the basket goes through the house like a tumbleweed, powered by George inside.

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They are definitely a bonded pair now, and love to hang out near me whenever they’re not playing.

Thanks for the work you all do.

Estelle

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